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Interview with Steve Gaddis (Excerpts)

An Interview between Steve Gaddis, Director of the Narrative Therapy Initiative, and Jeremiah Gibson, NEAFAST President (Excerpts)

Jeremiah Gibson: Hello, I’m Jeremiah Gibson, President of the New England Association for Family and Systemic Therapy or NEAFAST, and I’m so happy to be joined this afternoon by Steve Gaddis. Steve is the Director of the Narrative Therapy Initiative (NTI) in Salem. Steve, thanks for joining me today.

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Interview with Rosa Khorshidi (Exerpts)

An Interview between Rosa Khorshidi, LMFT, and Jeremiah Gibson, NEAFAST President (Excerpts)

NEAFAST is eager to highlight the work of its members.

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Interview with Steve Gaddis - Excerpts about NTI's 2019-2020 Programming

These excerpts from an Interview between Steve Gaddis, Director of the Narrative Therapy Initiative (NTI), and Jeremiah Gibson, NEAFAST President, focus on NTI's 2019-2020 programming, specifically the Apprenticeship Program and the Certificate Program.

Jeremiah Gibson: I wonder if I can ask a couple questions about the programming for 2019-2020. You’ve alluded to the Narrative Certificate Program. And then there’s another program that you guys are offering too that’s called the Apprenticeship Program. I’m wondering if you could take a few minutes to describe those.

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Nice But Not Necessary—And Other Clinical Supervision Myths Part One

Although regular clinical supervision is a pre-licensure requirement, once licensed, a therapist in Massachusetts can practice without regular clinical supervision. As a PhD student steeped in learning about, from, and through receiving and providing clinical supervision, I find the idea of not receiving supervision, especially related to self-of-the-therapist issues, concerning and rather sad. Do we ever stop growing, changing, and learning? Is there some after-licensure miracle that makes us impervious to our own demons, flaws, biases, and blind spots? Can we give an infinite amount of support to others without replenishing our own tanks? Nope. My husband, an LMHC who works in a community health center, practices without regular clinical supervision, as it is not required and hence not prioritized in a medical setting. Even as an experienced individual therapist, I watch him struggle under the weight of carrying his clients’ pain, with remaining empathetic and creative without burning out, and facing his own struggles without projecting them onto his clients. It doesn’t seem fair or right that he, and other therapists -- regardless of their time served -- are doing this critical work on their own, without structured support.

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Board Spotlight

Rachel Sachs Riverwood
Rachel’s diverse background and experiences bring unique perspectives and techniques to her integrative therapeutic work. After starting her career as a therapist and supervisor, she spent 15 years as a consultant, executive coach, and executive in healthcare and organizational development helping individuals and organizations develop and meet strategic goals, improve communication and build and maintain healthy organizations before finding herself called back to therapeutically help in healing hearts, minds, and relationships. 

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Nice But Not Necessary—And Other Clinical Supervision Myths Part Two

One thing I love about my MFT PhD program at Antioch New England is the opportunity to provide clinical supervision to masters students as they embark on their journey towards becoming therapists. As a student of experiential and Emotionally Focused Therapy, I feel strongly that effective supervision starts with developing a secure bond with each supervisee and, when you’re lucky enough to have a group of supervisees, building security and cohesiveness within the group as well.  In our Masters program students start with live supervision, and then ultimately graduate to self-report and video review and eventually more distance supervision as they undertake their internships. Working with student therapists, over our year together my key focus was on helping build confidence, growing within a theory that personally resonates, and exploring the multitude of person-of-the-therapist issues that arise starting with seeing first clients.

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